Waste 2 Art 2019

Waste 2 Art 2019

29th May – 14th July 2019
Opening – Saturday 8th June, 2pm

The Waste 2 Art competition returns to Eskbank House Museum for another year of art made from reused and recycled materials, challenging people to think differently about waste. Local artists of all ages are invited to respond to the challenge of creating artwork from materials that would otherwise be discarded as rubbish and end up in landfill. Winners from the local competition will represent Lithgow at regional level held at Oberon.

The Waste 2 Art competition and exhibition, a Netwaste initiative, seeks to raise awareness of environmental issues.

Download  Waste2Art-Form 2019 Entry Form

Penumbra: Julie Williams, Sarah Michell, Philip Spark and Tim Johnman

Penumbra: Julie Williams, Sarah Michell, Philip Spark and Tim Johnman

Saturday 11th May 2019, 6pm – 10pm

To celebrate LithGlow the grounds of Eskbank House Museum will showcase new works by four local artists. Titled Penumbra, the exhibition will explore the use and implications of light in contemporary practice. Penumbra refers to the peripheral or indeterminate space cast by light. For participating artists Julie Williams, Sarah Michell, Philip Spark and Tim Johnman, the term penumbra aptly describes their new collaboration as well as the experimentation with light as both medium and concept.

Meet the artists and wander the grounds of Eskbank House at night whilst being immersed in light-based sculpture, installation, drawing and film.

Blast Furnace Theatre present 3 Little Pigs

Blast Furnace Theatre

BLAST FURNACE THEATRE PRESENTS 3 LITTLE PIGS

Sat 13th, Sun 14th, Sat 20th, Sun 21st January 2018, 1pm start

For all ages

 

Bookings are essential – to book phone 0401478168

Enjoy a family picnic in the beautiful grounds of Eskbank house while The Three Little Pigs and a Rock’n’Roll Wolf engage in a battle of wits and wind. The pigs just want to be left alone. The wolf just wants to find fame and fortune. Will they overcome their natures and find a way to achieve their dreams, or will they be trapped by the classic story? This remastered fairy tale will have you laughing, dancing and rocking along.

This show is for the whole family, but aimed at children 5-12

Tickets are $15, or group bookings of 4+ $10 per person. Children under 4 enter free.

Eskbank Voices – 175th Anniversary Exhibition until 28th January 2018

Voices of Eskbank – 175th Anniversary exhibition 

25th November – 28th January

“…this building which represents so much in the history of Lithgow.” Lithgow Historical Committee to Australian Iron & Steel, 28 September 1944

Voices of Eskbank captures key moments and individuals associated with the history of Eskbank House including the influential industrialists Thomas Brown, James Rutherford, William Sandford and the Hoskins Brothers.

Eskbank House was built for Thomas and Mary Brown c.1841 – 1842 and has been at the heart of Lithgow’s industrial development ever since. Eric Bracey purchased it from Australian Iron and Steel in 1948, and with the Lithgow District Historical Society, opened it as museum on 21st November 1966.

This exhibition and accompanying publication mark the anniversary of that gift and 175 years since the house was built.

This exhibition was made possible with the support of a Heritage Near Me Grant from the New South Wales Government.

 

 

Eskbank Voices – 175th Anniversary

You’re invited to an open day at Eskbank House

Saturday, 25th November 2017

 To mark the 175th Anniversary of when Eskbank House was built, we are launching Eskbank Voices, a new publication and exhibition. Join us for music by Mitchell Conservatorium, a series of talks, cakes, and coffee and lunch available from Mint Brew.

 

11.30am               Welcome and Music by Mitchell Conservatorium: The Woodrow Trio

 

12 noon                Binning & Brown: The Architecture of Eskbank House

Speaker:              Dr. Ian Jack, Senior Fellow and Archivist, St. Andrew’s College, University of Sydney

Educated in Scotland, Ian Jack taught at the University of Sydney, where he served as Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Head of the Department of History.  A co-founder of Historical Archaeology at the University in 1974, he became deeply involved in heritage matters. He was appointed a member of the Heritage Council of New South Wales and chaired its State Heritage Register Committee.  He was also President of the Royal Australian Historical Society from 2004 until 2012.  Among his numerous consultancies was the Heritage Study of Greater Lithgow (1996-2000) and he has published on Andrew Brown of Cooerwull and on the iron industry.

 

1.00pm                 Recreating Historical Gardens

Facilitator:           Richard Aitken, former editor of Australian Garden History

Speakers:            Steven Halliday, Horticulturist Sydney Living Museum

                            Sandra Pullman, Gardens Coordinator La Trobe Cottage

Richard Aitken is recognised nationally and internationally for his expertise in the field of garden history. He was previously the editor of Australian Garden History, and his books include The Oxford Companion to Australian Gardens (2002), Gardenesque (2004), Botanical Riches (2006), Seeds of Change (2006), The Garden of Ideas (2010), Cultivating Modernism (2013) and Planting Dreams (2016). Richard has undertaken numerous conservation plans for significant historic gardens throughout Australia. He has curated several major exhibitions for Australia’s leading collecting institutions.

Steven Halliday has been part of the Gardens Team at Sydney Living Museums (SLM) for the past 8 years. In 2016 he was awarded the inaugural Ruth Pope scholarship, allowing him to travel to the United States of America to visit historic gardens projects. This trip sparked a desire to improve the SLM gardens online presence, and then on to launching the ‘Plant Your History’ garden blog.  Steve contributes to the blog sharing his knowledge and his experiences working on the SLM garden portfolios.

Sandra Pullman, as a member of the Friends of La Trobe’s Cottage, was instrumental in recreating Charles La Trobe’s colonial garden at the La Trobe Cottage in Melbourne. The garden received an award in 2014 for the historically sensitive restoration. Sandra graduated with a B.A.Sc. Hort Hons, from The University of Melbourne, and is currently completing a Master of Architecture Research thesis at Deakin University on Ina Higgins, who lobbied the Principal of the Burnley School of Horticulture in 1899 to allow women students.

 

2.30pm                 ReCollecting: Oral Histories and new technology

Speaker:              Lucy Bracey, associate historian with Way Back When.

Way Back When specialises in the creation of digital history projects, digital story-telling and oral history as well other more traditional ways of communicating the past. Lucy has produced a number of different audio documentaries and digital history projects for the Victorian AIDS Council, Monash University, the Sephardi Association of Victoria as well as several radio features for ABC Radio National.

 

From 3.15pm     Music by Mitchell Conservatorium

Innocent Bystanders: 11 piece Motown themed band

 

RSVP to summar.hipworth@lithgow.nsw.gov.au